DFM Engineering, Inc.
1035 Delaware Ave. Unit D
Longmont, CO 80501
Phone: 303-678-8143
Fax: 303-772-9411

 
 
Brown Mountain Lights
The Mystery of Burke County, North Carolina

North Carolina holds an unsolved mystery. Two orange orbs have confounded the residents and tourists of Burke County for at least a century.brown mountain map

The mysterious lights bob and weave in a rugged patch of Burke County and often slip down the side of a gorge in the Blue Ridge foothills.

What are they?

Well, there have been many interesting suppositions; from automobile headlight reflections to illusive brush fires to a wild paranormal phenomenon. Or maybe it is something natural not yet explained by science.

 mountain foothillsThe mysterious lights are causing quite a stir in Burke County, known by the community as "Nature's Playground" nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountain foothills of central North Carolina.

"It's a good problem to have," said Ed Phillips, Burke County's tourism director.

On Saturday, February 11, 2012, at the Morganton City Hall, Ed Phillips of the Burke County Tourism Development Authority presented the world's two most sought after speakers on the Mystery of the Brown Mountain Lights! Joshua P. Warren, Paranormal Investigator and Applachian State University Physicist and Astronomer, Dr. Dan Caton shared their theories on the origins of the mysterious lights.

Dr Dan CatonIt was a sell-out crowd attending the "Brown Mountain Lights Symposium" at Morganton City Hall. Lines of hopeful attendees extended out the door wishing for a glimpse of Mr. Warren’s actual video of the famous lights and Dr. Caton's scientific theories explaining their existence.

It may just be the mystery of it all that puts Morganton on the map and on the list of places to visit. And, tourism director, Ed Phillips is quite happy about that!

The news of the mysterious lights and the symposium interest captured the attention of the Denver Post easily 6 states to the west in Colorado.

The Denver Post article featured Dr. Dan Caton standing by his DFM Engineering 16" telescope at Appalachian State University in North Carolina.


Read the Denver Post Article

CCT-16 Telescope

Telescope Control System (TCS)